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Corinthian Yacht Club (U.S.)

New York

Last modified: 2018-07-26 by rick wyatt
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Corinthian Yacht Club

The Corinthian Yacht Club of New York manual from ca. 1890 shows burgee and rank flags. See also Corinthian Yacht Club (Massachusetts).
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Type: Book
Language: English
Title: Corinthian Yacht Club, of New York, 1892.
Apparently written and published in house, probably for the year to come.
Height 16 cm
Contains: 61 pages plus 1 + 8 coloured plates of flags.
Digital at: Internet Archive: Library of Congress copy, Hathi Trust; University of Illinois Library copy

The title page of the 1892 year book tells us the club was organised in 1886 and incorporated 1887.
The New York Public Library Digital Collections show a print of the "Model-room of the Corinthian Yacht Club of New York, at Tompkinsville, Staten Island", which would suggest this was also the club's location. (Each yacht owner was to supply a 1:32 model of his yacht (hull) to the club.)

A quick search of the Internet has not yielded a later date for the club than 1892.

The book contains the by-laws, which include:

Chapter IV.
Of the flag and signals, etc.

Sec. 1. The Club Pennant shall be a white field with a red cross (one-fifth in width of the hoist) bearing eight white stars six and three in the fly and the hoist respectively, the middle star counting both ways. Members holding the certificate of master shall bear a red star in the upper quarter next to the hoist.

Sec. 2. The Admiral's Flag shall be a rectangular broad pennant of similar design, bearing five and five stars with a red "foul anchor," in place of the red star, and having one and one-fifth inches of fly to each inch of hoist.

Sec. 3. The Fleet Captain's Flag shall be similar to the Admiral's Flag, but with the red star in place of the "foul anchor."

Sec. 4. All of the above shall have a three eighth inch hoist for each roof from truck to water, and the Pennant one and one-half inches of fly for each inch of hoist.

Sec. 5. At night a Coston Signal showing red then white, followed by a red star and a white star shall be used.
The Admiral wasn't in this case a patron of some sort; he was president, commander and treasurer. Yacht owning members were expected to obtain a Yachting Master's Certificate within two years, either from England, or an equivalent from the US, or from the club.

Mention is also made of the club's motto: Altissima petimus. ["We seek the highest"] The club was limited to 100 members - all of them listed in the yearbook - not counting honorary members - listed separately.

The book also contains the sailing regulations, which include:
8. Distinguishing flags.
Each yacht must carry her private signal at the main peak, unless distinguishing numbers are furnished by the Club, in which case such numbers must be permanently displayed in a conspicuous place.
In the back of the book, starting at page 62, follow 68 private signals of yacht owners and 14 non-yacht owners flags.

Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 14 April 2018

Admiral

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Admiral, rectangular 4:5, white with red cross with 9 white stars and a red anchor (same as in the US Yacht Ensign) in canton.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Fleet Captain

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Fleet Captain, rectangular 4:5, white with red cross with 9 white stars and a red star in the canton.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Burgee (masters certificate)

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Burgee (masters certificate), triangular 2:3, white with red cross with 8 white stars and a red star in the canton.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Burgee

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Burgee, triangular 2:3, triangular 2:3, white with red cross with 8 white stars.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018


Somewhat later manual, undated in the post, but obviously digitized by Google, so should not be difficult to locate, shows a new set.

Commodore

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Commodore, triangular swallow-tailed blue with white 3 stars along the hoist and a white Pegasus.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Vice-Commodore

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Vice-Commodore, triangular swallow-tailed blue with white 2 stars along the hoist and a white Pegasus.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Rear Commodore

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Rear Commodore, triangular swallow-tailed white with a blue star next to the hoist and a blue Pegasus.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Burgee

[Corinthian Yacht Club] image by Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Burgee, triangular, white, red, blue triangles with vertex at the base hoist, blue star in the canton.

This is the present CYC burgee, I believe, but the rank flags would have been replaced with the "standard" pattern in the early 20th century or so.

I wonder if the Pegasus is there to show the link with the Royal Corinthian YC - its old ensign and burgee using the same badge.

The last burgee we already have, but I redraw it with "standard" colours as we use for the US flag.

Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018

Near Corinth, the Pegasus had dug with its own hooves a well that never ran dry. It was there that it came to drink, thus it came to be associated with Corinth, and with the Corinthian ideal of striving for greatness, rather than for payment. It's said that even the muses come there, to find the inspiration they bring to those they favour.
Željko Heimer, 30 March 2018
Peter Hans van den Muijzenberg, 14 April 2018