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Lubbock, Texas (U.S.)

Lubbock County

Last modified: 2018-07-30 by rick wyatt
Keywords: lubbock | texas | lubbock county |
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[Flag of Lubbock, Texas] 2:3 image(s) by permission of David B. Martucci
image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright.



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Current Flag

The flag of Lubbock was officially adopted on 11 February 1971, the result of a contest held in 1970 by the Women’s Club of Lubbock. The design submitted by the city planning department staff was the winning entry from among more than 100 received. The flag has the proportions of 2:3. Its field is the same as the state flag of Texas without the star: a vertical blue stripe at the hoist, one-third of the field’s width, and the remainder of the field divided horizontally white over red. In the center of the field is the city seal, with a diameter of 1.5 units. The seal is encircled by a white band edged in gold on both sides, which in turn are edged in white on the outer and inner edges of the band. Arched over the top half of the seal, from one horizontal midpoint to the other, is CITY OF LUBBOCK in red block letters. Centered below, counterclockwise, is TEXAS in blue block letters.

On either side of the state’s name is a gold five-pointed star. The inner portion of the seal has a blue field with a silhouette of the state of Texas in white that extends beyond the field’s edges on all four sides. A small gold five-pointed star marks the location of Lubbock, and a thin blue ray extends from each point outward to the borders of the state. In the horizontal center, in the state’s east-central portion on the map, appears 1909 in small black numerals.

Red, white, and blue echo the colors of the national and state flags. The star designating Lubbock, with rays emanating from it, symbolizes the city’s nickname, “Hub City” of the south plains. The date, 1909, is the year of the city’s incorporation. Since legislation adopting this flag has apparently not been repealed, and the current flag is unofficial, this flag may still be the legal version, although it has long since disappeared from city hall.

Here is the text of Joe Gulick from 2004 that clears the facts about two city flags:

"Lubbock's official city flag apparently is not the "Legendary Lubbock" flag that is currently standing in City Council chambers - and which received a low rating in a recent online survey of city flags. That flag's adoption by the city was an unofficial one. However, an earlier flag was officially adopted by the city on Feb. 11, 1971. That flag, featuring a red, white and blue color configuration similar to the Texas flag with a seal of Lubbock in the middle, has faded into obscurity. But it may well currently stand as Lubbock's official flag if its adoption was not repealed, according to the North American Vexillological Association book "American City Flags: 150 Flags from Akron to Yonkers." The 1971 flag was the result of a contest held by the Women's Club of Lubbock in 1970, according to the NAVA book. More than 100 designs were submitted, and the winning design was prepared by the city planning department staff.

Former Mayor Alan Henry and retired city employees recalled that there was an earlier flag that was the result of a contest, but they did not know the correct date. Henry thought it occurred at Lubbock's 75th anniversary in 1984, and longtime city employee David Jones thought it occurred at the time of the nation's bicentennial. No one could recall what the earlier flag looked like.

The current flag features a jukebox-design logo designed in 1996 by the Lubbock Convention and Visitors Bureau that reads "Legendary Lubbock." Under the logo are the words "Music Crossroads of Texas," which was a designation given to Lubbock by the Texas Legislature in 1999. The flag was first raised on April 5, 2000, by then-Mayor Windy Sitton and students participating in Local Government Week in Lubbock County, according to the NAVA book. The "Legendary Lubbock" flag was recently ranked 144th out of 150 in a survey of city flags in the United States on NAVA's Web site. Ted Kaye, who conducted the NAVA survey, said this week he thinks the "Legendary Lubbock" design is a great logo that did not work as a flag design. Just because survey participants did not like Lubbock's city flag did not necessarily mean they did not like the logo, he said. Lloyd Caballero, vice president of the Thomas Agency, which designed the logo, said that it was not designed to be a flag. "Logos are meant to be seen close-up on a flat surface and not moving," Kaye said. "What you draw or see on a piece of paper in front of you is not necessarily going to work well on a piece of fabric 200 feet away while it's moving - and when you may be seeing it from the back.""
Source: www.lubbockonline.com/stories/110404/loc_110404031.shtml.

Valentin Poposki, 26 February 2009

It looks like the Jukebox themed flag and logo are no longer in use. There is no sign of the flag in pictures that I can find of the council chambers, and the city has adopted a new logo. In this 2011 picture of the police honor guard, the previous Texas-y flag of the City of Lubbock appears to be back in use with the addition of a vertical white stripe along the blue bar at the hoist:
https://www.facebook.com/LubbockPD
Dave Fowler, 17 February 2018


Former Flag

[Flag of Lubbock, Texas] image(s) by permission of David B. Martucci
image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright.

Text and image(s) from American City Flags, Raven 9-10 (2002-2003), courtesy of the North American Vexillological Association, which retains copyright. Image(s) from American City Flags by permission of David B. Martucci.

Design

Lubbock’s logo fills most of the white field of the city’s flag. The logo is a large semi-circle atop a horizontal base, a thin blue rectangle fimbriated in gold over red that stretches from one edge of the logo to the other. On the rectangle is Music Crossroads of Texas, in white. Above this bar are two arches, the inner about two and one-half times the width of the outer, which has a blue area that shimmers from light to dark to nearly purple and back again, from about 10 to 2 o’clock. The remaining space on either side (9 to 10 and 2 to 3 o’clock) is filled with two vertical gold bars, a thin blue line between them, curved to conform to the borders of the arch, which is also fimbriated in gold.

On the blue portion of the area across the top of the arch, in white letters shaded in black and spaced evenly across the field, is LEGENDARY. A narrow white space, little more than a stripe, separates the top arch from the lower one, which has a narrow white border edged in black on both sides. The area of the arch is shaded a shimmering red, from dark to light to dark again from side to side. A black-edged gold five-pointed star sits on the base of the field on either side of the arch. In between is LUBBOCK, in very large white letters edged in dark blue. In the remaining space below this arch is a shimmering gold silhouette map of Texas, bordered in gold, with a white star showing the city’s location in the northwest portion of the state. A small part of the top of the map extends onto the arch above it, so that the “BB” in the city’s name rests on top of the map. Filling in the area behind the silhouette is a purple area on which a number of thin white rays in the fashion of a sunburst emanate upward to the edge of the arch from the center base point.
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Symbolism

The logo is meant to be eye-catching. Whether the symbolism was intended or not, the logo resembles the top of an oldfashioned jukebox, reinforcing the city’s claim as the “Music Crossroads of Texas”.
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Selection

The logo was created in 1998 without the motto below it. In 1999, the city council passed legislation creating the motto, and authorized its inclusion below the logo. The flag was developed shortly thereafter, presumably by city hall personnel.
Flag adopted: 1999 (unofficial).
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

Designer

The logo was created by the Thomas Agency (a design firm).
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

More about the Flag

The flag was first raised 5 April 2000 by the mayor and students participating in Local Government Week in Lubbock County.
John M. Purcell, American City Flags, Raven 9-10, 2002-2003

It looks like the Jukebox themed flag and logo are no longer in use. There is no sign of the flag in pictures that I can find of the council chambers, and the city has adopted a new logo. In this 2011 picture of the police honor guard, the previous Texas-y flag of the City of Lubbock appears to be back in use with the addition of a vertical white stripe along the blue bar at the hoist:
https://www.facebook.com/LubbockPD/
https://www.facebook.com/LubbockPD/
https://www.facebook.com/LubbockPD/

The seal is larger and more colorful than the one shown here, though I could not find one on the web.

New logo (not on flag): http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d4/Lubbock_tx_city_logo.png
Dave Fowler, 7 July 2014