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Santa María del Tiétar (Municipality, Castilla y León, Spain)

Last modified: 2014-12-27 by ivan sache
Keywords: santa maría del tiétar | ávila |
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Flag of Santa María del Tiétar - Image by Ivan Sache, 6 May 2011 (reconstructed image, no original seen)

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Presentation of Santa María del Tiétar

The municipality of Santa María del Tiétar (619 inhabitants in 2010; 1,190 ha; municipal website) is located in the southeast of Ávila Province, on the border with Madrid Autonomous Community, 65 km of Ávila.

Santa María del Tiétar was originally known as Escarabajosa, as listed in Alfonso XI's Libro de la Montería. The village belonged to the Community of the Town and Land of Ávila. Transferred in the 15th century to the town of Escalona (Toledo), Santa María del Tiétar was granted on 9 September 1423 by John II to Álvaro de Luna, who bequeathed it to his son Juan in 1438. Following the execution of Álvaro de Luna in 1453 and the confiscation of his goods, his widow Juana Pimentel, aka the Sad Widow, agreed on 30 June 1453 to retrocede the Tiétar Valley to Escalona. In 1472, Juan Pacheco, Marquis of Villena, was made Duke of Santa Santa María del Tiétar by Henry IV; his descendants ruled the village until the suppression of the feudal system in 1811.

Ivan Sache, 6 May 2011

Symbols of Santa María del Tiétar

The flag and arms of Santa María del Tiétar are prescribed by a Decree adopted on 6 June 1995 by the Provincial Executive and published on 28 June 1995 in the official gazette of Castilla y León, No. 123 (text).
The symbols are described as follows:

Flag: Quadrangular flag, with proportions 1:1, quartered blue and white. In the middle of the flag is placed the municipal coat of arms in full colors.
Coat of arms: Per pale, 1. Azure ten roundels argent 3 + 3 + 3 + 1 over waves argent and azure, 2. Gules a crescent argent a chief of the same. The shield surmounted with a Royal Spanish crown.

Ivan Sache, 6 May 2011