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Shenzhen (Nanshan) Concord College of Sino-Canada

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[Shenzhen (Nanshan) Concord College of Sino-Canada]
image contributed by Valentin Poposki, 5 November 2005

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Shenzhen (Nanshan) Concord College of Sino-Canada is located in the so called 'Special Economic Zone' of Shenzhen in southern China, not far from Hong Kong.

The following description is taken from the College's web site. Considering that it is written in what is obviously not the author's first language, the text is very clear and informative. I wonder if Miles or other Chinese speakers might compare the English and Chinese texts in terms of accuracy:

'The college flag is in the shape of a rectangle. The middle part is yellow and others are dark blue. The college badge is placed in the mid center of the flag. Underneath the school badge is the English abbreviation CCSC.'

The school badge is illustrated beneath the description of the flag.

The college is a joint Canadian-Chinese venture, but it is not a college in the sense that I would use the word. CCSC used the word in the classical British sense of an academically oriented secondary school. However, the word 'college' is subject to many definitions within an educational context: it can be used to refer (also in British usage) to a constituent component of a collegiate organized university, as is the case with respect to the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge (other quasi-educational British usages such as the Royal College of Surgeons are in this case irrelevant). In American usage, the word 'college' refers to an independent or autonomous institution authorized to issue its own undergraduate degrees (in some cases postgraduate degrees as well), or as an administrative unit of a large academic body, such as the College of Education of Indiana University.
Ron Lahav, 4 November 2005