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Castillejo de Robledo (Municipality, Castilla y León, Spain)

Last modified: 2015-01-08 by ivan sache
Keywords: castillejo de robledo | soria |
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Presentation of Castillejo de Robledo

The municipality of Castillejo de Robledo (137 inhabitants in 2010; 5,298 ha; unofficial website) is the westernmost municipality in Soria Province, located on the border with the Burgos and Segovia Provinces, 100 km from Soria.

Castillejo de Robledo was originally known as Robledal de Corpes and mentioned under this name in the Cantar de Mío Cid, the oldest Spanish chanson de geste. Corpes is formed on two Latin names, cor, "a heart", and pies, "feet"; the "feet" would be the valleys surrounding the village and the "heart" would be the rock located in the middle of the village. The modern name of the village recalls a fortification (castillejo) owned by the Knight Templars; after the suppression of the Order in 1311 by Pope Clement V, the village was transferred to the Count of Miranda and Duke of Peľaranda.

Ivan Sache, 2 May 2011


Symbols of Castillejo de Robledo

The flag of Castillejo de Robledo is prescribed by a Decree adopted on 23 June 1997 by the Soria Provincial Government, signed on 25 June 1997 by the President of the Government, and published on 3 July 1997 in the official gazette of Castilla y León, No. 126 (text).
The flag is described as follows:

Flag: Quadrangular flag, white. In the middle of the flag is placed the municipal coat of arms.

The coat of arms of Castillejo de Robledo is prescribed by a Decree adopted on 23 June 1997 by the Soria Provincial Government, signed on 25 June 1997 by the President of the Government, and published on 3 July 1997 in the official gazette of Castilla y León, No. 126 (text).
The coat of arms is described as follows:

Coat of arms: Per fess; 1. Gules a cross flory or, 2. [Azure] a castle argent surrounded by two oaks [robles] proper terraced vert. The shield surmounted with a Royal crown.

The Royal Academy of History validated the new version of the proposed arms but noticed that the drawing appended to the proposal did not match the textual description: the cross flory was superseded by another cross, while the terrace was omitted. The description of the flag was not forwarded to the Academy (Boletín de la Real Academia de la Historia, 1998, 195, 2: 373).

Ivan Sache, 2 May 2011