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Funeral Flag

Last modified: 2018-05-18 by rob raeside
Keywords: funeral flag |
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[Funeral flag] image by RD Caruso, 17 October 2004

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Description of the flag

I noticed a funeral procession coming down the road, and for the first time saw that all the vehicles in this procession carried small banners on them. I have never seen this before, so it must be relatively new.

Vehicles usually bear one or two banners affixed at the front corners. I noticed cars and the hearse bearing two flags affixed to either side of the hood, while SUVs and trucks affixed them above the doors. The banners were of typical desktop size, about 4" by 6" or slightly larger attached by what looked to be a simple plastic clip or magnetic base.

The flag seems to be a variant of St. George's Cross, with the cross itself being white on light purple, with the letters "FUNERAL" written across the centre of the cross. There is a variant which I noticed was used in the same procession at random. This variant was minus the word "FUNERAL" in the centre and simply a white & purple version of St. George's Cross. Whether this has some deeper meaning or is just random is unknown.
RD Caruso, 17 October 2004


Other funeral flags

A wide range of flags are available in (U.S.) flag shops to indicate funerals. Some are shown below.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

These are car flags for use on vehicles in funeral processions. They are a way of saying to other motorists in adjoining lanes or merge ramps "this is a funeral procession, not a random temporary traffic backup - please do not cut in." Depending on the length of the procession and the road conditions it might not always be obvious without some sort of signal such as these flags.
Ned Smith, 6 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

Purple field with white extra-wide Swiss cross centered--FUNERAL in purple letters inside.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

Like the previous flag, but with the colors reversed--white field, purple cross, with FUNERAL inside in white.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

Orange field (like in construction safety signs) with a black Swiss cross--inside, there's FUNERAL written in orange letters.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

Orange field (like in construction safety signs) with a white Swiss cross--inside, there's FUNERAL written in black letters.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

Purple field, with a fancy white cross patonce scrollant (with its ends in a design that's a crux between a cross buttonée and a cross fleury)--FUNERAL is emblazoned thereon in purple lettering.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

The colors of the previous flag reversed--white field, purple cross patonce scrollant, and white lettering inside for FUNERAL.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

 The same design done with an orange field and black cross patonce scrollant. Inside the cross is emblazoned FUNERAL in orange lettering.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

The same orange field as above, but with a white fancy cross p.s., and black lettering for FUNERAL inside.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

A plain black field, with emblazoned FUNERAL in white lettering. This flag is used when a funeral service is in progress.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005

[Funeral flag] image by Tomislav Todorović, 20 April 2018

The familiar black / purple / black horizontal triband banner. This design is even transferred onto bunting and cockades.
Robert Lloyd Wheelock, 4 June 2005