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National Guard Bureau (U.S.)

Last modified: 2019-01-01 by rick wyatt
Keywords: national guard bureau | chief |
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[National Guard Bureau flag] image by Randy Young, 14 August 2016


See also:


Description

I found some photos of what appears to be the agency flag of the U.S. National Guard Bureau from the swearing in of the last 2 Chiefs of the NGB. So in addition to the position standard already shown below, it seems there is a separate organization flag.

"National Guard Bureau is the federal instrument responsible for the administration of the United States National Guard established by the United States Congress as a joint bureau of the Department of the Army and the Department of the Air Force. It was created by the Militia Act of 1903"

The flag is white with the seal: https://www.c-span.org/video/?413551-1/defense-secretary-speaks-national-guard-bureau-chief-swearingin-ceremony
(August 3, 2016, National Guard Bureau Leadership Defense Secretary Ashton Carter spoke at a ceremony as Army General Frank Grass stepped down as chief of the bureau and Air Force Lieutenant General Joseph Lengyel was sworn in to take his place)

Seal: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/NGB-seal-high.png/200px-NGB-seal-high.png

A gray(?) flag with variant seal: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons
(Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, right, presents the flag of the National Guard Bureau (NGB) to U.S. Army Gen. Frank Grass during a change of responsibility ceremony Sept. 7, 2012)

Another Seal can be seen at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Seal_of_the_National_Guard_Bureau_(US).svg
Ben Cahoon, 10 August 2016

The chiefs and deputy chiefs of the National Guard Bureau come from either the Army National Guard (ARNG), or the Air National Guard (ANG). The chief is a 4-star general (since 17 Nov 2008), and the deputy chief is a 3-star lieutenant general. ANG general officers use standard USAF positional flags: http://www.apexflags.com/catalog/item/7960370/8571029.htm

ARNG general officers, serving in state or territorial billets use special rank flags, with the state or territorial crest: http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/

The chief and the deputy chief of the National Guard Bureau however, use the standard scarlet US Army rank flags:
http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Catalog/HeraldryList.aspx?CategoryId=9355&grp=2&menu=Uniformed%20Services

There is also a senior enlisted advisor to the chief of the National Guard Bureau, but to date, unlike the senior enlisted advisor to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, this billet has not been authorized a flag.
Dave Fowler, 10 August 2016


Earlier version

[National Guard Bureau flag] image by Randy Young, 13 August 2016


Chief of National Guard Bureau

[Chief of National Guard Bureau flag] image by Miles Li, 4 December 2009

Positional Color, Office of the Chief, National Guard Bureau. This officer represents both the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard. Accordingly, his flag is a diagonal bicolor with dark blue (for the Army) on the bottom and ultramarine blue (for the Air Force) on top. The badge in the center of the flag is the branch insignia of the Natioanl Guard Bureau; it dates from the turn of the century. The two triangles in the upper fly are "flight devices" meant to symbolize the Air National Guard.
Tom Gregg, 7 June 1998

The 1998 update to AR 840-10 indicates that the Positional Color of the Chief, National Guard Bureau has been modified. Two scrolls have been added: a small one above the insignia with the date 1636 and a large one below the insignia with the inscription NATIONAL GUARD.
Tom Gregg, 11 September 1999


Former Version (1998-2008)

[Positional Color] image by Miles Li, 4 December 2009


Positional Color since 2008

[Positional Color] image by Miles Li, 4 December 2009

 On November 17, 2008 General Craig R. McKinley, USAF became the first four-star general to head the National Guard Bureau. Accordingly the Positional Color, as shown on his letterheads, now bears four white five-pointed stars, two on each side horizontally, while the two arrowheads in the upper fly have been removed.
Miles Li, 4 December 2009