This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Department of the Treasury (U.S.)

Last modified: 2018-12-28 by rick wyatt
Keywords: treasury | departmental | united states |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



[Flag of the Department of the Treasury] image by Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001



See also:


Description

The U.S. Treasury flag is described as follows:

Flag: Mintleaf green, upon which the shield rests on an eagle. In the eagle's beak is a scroll with the words "The Department of Treasury." The obverse of the scroll is "Old Glory blue" with white letters and the reverse is white with dark gray. In the claws, the eagle holds a second scroll with the date of creation "1789" in white.

Shield: The background of the shield is yellow with brown outlines and yellow-orange shadows. On the right is an oak branch and an olive branch on the left. There is also a blue chevron with 13 white stars. Below the chevron is a white Treasury key and above the chevron are balanced scales in white pivoting on a blue anchor.

The flag was approved on January 11, 1963 by Secretary C. Douglas Dillon and first displayed on July 1, 1963.
Phil Nelson, 24 September 1998

These flags are governed by Treasury Directive 73-03, dated September 14, 2001, "Official Flags of the Department of the Treasury." The image shows the flag in the 69 x 112 inch proportions for hoisting outdoors. There is also a 52 x 66 inch version with gold fringe for indoor display. The image was made from a scan of an official color guide prepared by the Army Institute of Heraldry and approved by Treasury Secretary Douglas Dillon in 1963, which I found in the Coast Guard Historian's files.

An older Treasury flag (1887-ca. 1914) may be seen at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/nih_origins/origins2.html
Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001

TD 73-03 has been superseded as of September 14, 2001 and is available at http://www.ustreas.gov/regs/td73-03.htm and lists officials who may use the treasury flag. Probably no change to the documentation, just a periodic review.
Phil Nelson, 11 December 2001


Alternate Blue Flag

[Alternate Blue Flag of the Department of the Treasury] image by Randy Young, 2 February 2015

There appears to be a variant of the US Department of the Treasury flag in use. So far as I can tell, the normal green flag is used at the Treasury Department itself, but in some external agency flag displays, a simplified version, consisting of the agency deal on a dark blue field is utilized instead. The photos here, are from the National Intelligence University:
media.dma.mil/2014/Aug/29/2000930190/600/400/0/140825-G-AB123-001.JPG
media.dma.mil/2014/Aug/11/2000810777/600/400/0/140811-G-AB123-002.JPG
i.ytimg.com/vi/bfrOIRkRhU8/0.jpg
Treasury seal: http://upload.wikimedia.org
Dave Fowler, 1 February 2015

The green Treasury Department flag is still current; you can see it flying on or in front of every Treasury building in Washington--main Treasury, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, etc.
Joe McMillan, 13 February 2015


Secretary of the Treasury

[Flag of the Secretary of the Treasury] image by Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001

From Treasury Directive 73-03, dated September 14, 2001:
The Flag of Rank for the Secretary has a background of old glory blue fringed in golden yellow. The shield background, crossed anchors outside the shield, and 13 crested stars are all in white. Inside the shield, the balances above the chevron, the chevron, and the traditional Treasury key beneath the chevron are all in old glory blue.
Phil Nelson, 29 October 1999


Deputy Secretary of the Treasury

[Flag of the Deputy Secretary of the Treasury] image by Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001

From Treasury Directive 73-03, dated September 14, 2001:
The Flag of Rank for the Deputy Secretary has a background of white fringed in golden yellow. The shield background, crossed anchors outside the shield, and 13 crested stars are all in old glory red. Inside the shield, the balances above the chevron, the chevron, and the traditional Treasury key beneath the chevron are all in white.
Phil Nelson, 29 October 1999

Old Glory red on white is an anomaly that comes from the relatively recent establishment of this position. The traditional sequence of U.S. rank flags from senior to junior would be white on blue, white on red, blue on white, and red on white. The flag is 52 x 66 inches with golden yellow fringe (fringe not shown).
Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001


Under Secretary of the Treasury

[Flag of the Under Secretary of the Treasury] image by Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001

From Treasury Directive 73-03, dated September 14, 2001:
The Flag of Rank for an Under Secretary has a background of old glory red fringed in golden yellow. The shield background, crossed anchors outside the shield, and 13 crested stars are all in white. Inside the shield, the balances above the chevron, the chevron, and the traditional Treasury key beneath the chevron are all in old glory red.
Phil Nelson, 29 October 1999

There are three under secretaries in the Treasury Department. The flag is 52 x 66 inches with golden yellow fringe (fringe not shown).
Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001


Assistant Secretary of the Treasury

[Flag of the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury] image by Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001

From Treasury Directive 73-03, dated September 14, 2001:
The Flag of Rank for an Assistant Secretary has a background of white fringed in golden yellow. The shield background, crossed anchors outside the shield, and 13 crested stars are all in old glory blue. Inside the shield, the balances above the chevron, the chevron, and the traditional Treasury key beneath the chevron are all in white.
Phil Nelson, 29 October 1999

There are ten assistant secretaries in the Treasury Department. The flag is 52 x 66 inches with golden yellow fringe (fringe not shown).
Joe McMillan, 10 December 2001


Department of the Treasury Flag of 1887

[1887 Treasury flag] image by Rob Raeside, 1 October  2011
based on www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/nih_origins/origins2.html, the historical DoT flag.

Department of the Treasury old flag of c.1887 - 1915
This flag is just the OLD Treasury Dept seal on white flag, surrounded by 8 dark navy blue stars. The lettering looks like it was reddish orange, similarly the branches and flowers appear to be lightly colored green and pink. I think the background is a silver gray, I have debated if I thought it was silver that had aged to gray, but I think it must have been a shade of gray given the cost that it must have been then to make silver on flag.
Ben Cahoon, 25 August 2011


Divisions Without Their Own Flag

Today I received replies from two popular government offices regarding their flags. The United States Bureau of Engraving and Printing prints paper money and the United States Mint makes coins. Each are a division of the United States Department of Treasury. Each use the flag of the Department of Treasury. They do not have their own specific flag.
Sean McKinniss, 29 November 2002


Display Order of Precedence

A friend of mine who works in the Intelligence Community brought me printed pictures of award ceremonies held in November and December 2014 at CIA, NGA, and ODNI. At each ceremony, the green Treasury flag is clearly seen in the background in the row of flags.

Also interesting to note, was the order of precedence for the flags. Of course, the American flag comes first, followed by the five military services in order of their establishment: US Army, US Marine Corps, US Navy, US Air Force, and US Coast Guard (last due, I assume, to its dual role under DHS and DOD). Next come all of the Cabinet departments in order of seniority, with no flag for State Department even though members of the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR) were present to receive awards. Next comes the DNI's flag, followed by the intelligence agencies in order of precedence. It was the precedence of the intelligence agencies that I found most interesting: FBI, then CIA, then NSA, then DIA, then NRO, then NGA.

Of note:
No State Department flag despite members of INR present to receive awards
No Justice Department flag among the Cabinet members since FBI was represented by its own flag
FBI takes a position of precedence over CIA among the Intelligence Community flags due to its earlier date of establishment
All members of the Intelligence Community that fall under Cabinet departments were represented by the flags of their respective departments, indicating that those entities have no separate flags to represent them. Those entities would include:

  • Department of Energy
    Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence
  • Department of Homeland Security
    Office of Intelligence & Analysis
    Homeland Security Investigations, Office of Intelligence
  • Department of State
    Bureau of Intelligence and Research
  • Department of the Treasury
    Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence
  • Department of Justice
    DEA, Office of National Security Intelligence
Randy Young, 4 February 2015