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Resolute Support (NATO)

RS

Last modified: 2015-02-28 by Zachary Harden
Keywords: nato | otan | compass | international organization | rs | resolute rupport |
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[Flag of NATO Resolute Support]
image by Zoltan Horvath, 26 February 2015


See also:

Overview

Originally published on BBC News (online version) on December 28, 2014, the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan will turn into the new mission called "Resolute Support". This within the scope of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) . It is the formal end to the US-led NATO intervention in the War in Afghanistan (2001-2014): "On 28 December 2014 NATO formally ended combat operations in Afghanistan and transferred full security responsibility to the Afghan government via a ceremony in Kabul".
Sources: http://www.isaf.nato.int/article/isaf-news/transition-cremony-kicks-off-resolute-support-mission.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_in_Afghanistan_(2001–present)
http://www.afghanwarnews.info/resolute-support.htm  and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resolute_Support_Mission
This ceremony also includes Police forces as well.
Source: http://www.isaf.nato.int/article/isaf-news/international-police-reps-pledge-support-to-afghan-national-police-ministry-of-interior.html
"Thirteen years after its creation through the signing of the Bonn Agreement in Germany, the International Security Assistance Force concluded operations in an event today transitioning to the new, NATO-led Resolute Support mission.
ISAF’s original mandate was to assist the newly-established Afghan Transitional Authority in and around Kabul. The scope and scale of ISAF’s mission grew as the Coalition added Provincial Reconstruction Teams and took on the responsibility to provide security while Afghan security forces were growing in strength. A critical function throughout the effort was the mentoring and training of Afghan forces. ISAF’s lasting legacy, accomplished with Afghan partners, was the establishment of a 350,000-strong security force, which today is fully responsible for security in Afghanistan.
Under Resolute Support, efforts to train, advise, and assist Afghan Security Institutions (ASI) and the ANSF at the ministerial, operational, and institutional levels will focus on eight essential functions: Multi-year Budgeting (EF 1); Transparency, Accountability and Oversight (EF 2); Civilian Governance of the ASI (EF 3); Force Generation (EF 4); Sustainment (EF 5); Strategy and Policy Planning, resourcing, and Execution (EF 6); Intelligence (EF 7); and Strategic Communication (EF 8).
These eight essential functions comprise the systems and processes required for the professionalism and sustainability of the ASI and ANSF."
Source: http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/news_116351.htm?selectedLocale=en
"While the mission of the will be completed at the end of 2014 (the commitment was to transfer all power by the December 31, 2014 at most, but this was done three days earlier than scheduled), training, advice and assistance for the Afghan security forces and institutions will continue through a new, follow-on NATO-led mission called Resolute Support . This mission will not involve combat. Its support will be directed primarily to Afghan ministries and institutions, as well as the higher command level of the Afghan security forces. Planning and force generation are well underway.
The detailed operation plan for Resolute Support was approved by NATO Foreign Ministers at the end of June 2014. The legal framework for the Resolute Support Mission (RSM) is provided by a Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA), which was signed in Kabul on 30 September 2014 by the newly inaugurated Afghan President and NATO’s Senior Civilian Representative to Afghanistan, and later ratified by the Afghan Parliament on 27 November 2014. The SOFA defines the terms and conditions under which NATO forces will be deployed in Afghanistan as part of Resolute Support, as well as the activities that they are set to carry out under this agreement.
Approximately 12,000 personnel from both NATO and partner nations will be deployed in support of the mission. The mission is planned to operate with one central hub (in Kabul/Bagram) and four spokes in Mazar-e Sharif, Herat, Kandahar and Laghman.
Key functions will include:
- Supporting planning, programming and budgeting
- Assuring transparency, accountability and oversight
- Supporting the adherence to the principles of rule of law and good governance
- Supporting the establishment and sustainment of such processes as force generation, recruiting, training, managing and development of personnel.
Beyond the training, advice and assistance mission, Allies and partners countries are committed to the broader international community’s support for the long-term financial sustainment of the Afghan security forces."
Source: http://www.nato.int/cps/da/natohq/topics_113694.htm
Esteban Rivera, 30 December 2014


The Flag

At a recent ceremony in Afghanistan, the flag of NATO's Operation Resolute Support:
Source: http://www.army.mil/media/377107/
Dave Fowler, 30 December 2014

The new flag can be seen here (it has the same structure as the ISAF flag having the letters "R" and "S" in the same font, also in white capitals).
Esteban Rivera, 30 December 2014

I created flag image of new flag of NATO mission 'Resolute Support'. Its new flag is similar to its predecessor, ISAF, its green with its emblem, but has a new Pashtu motto under the abbreviation RS (Resolute Support). It reads: "ta’alimat, kumak, mashwerat" (training, assistance, advice) and replaced ISAF’s "kumak wa hamkari" (assistance and cooperation).
Zoltan Horvath, 26 February 2015