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Savings Bond flags (U.S.)

Last modified: 2016-07-27 by rick wyatt
Keywords: united states | savings bonds | minuteman |
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Minuteman flags

The Minuteman flags were awards of the US Treasury Department during World War II for meeting or exceeding US Bond sales to pay for the war. The basic design was patented on August 18, 1942, by the Secretary of the Treasury.
Dave Martucci, 4 January 2010


Minuteman flag, 1942-present

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

This flag is still in use. From 1942 until sometime in the 1960s or 1970s it was awarded to businesses enrolling 90% or more of their employees in a Payroll Deduction program for buying Bonds. Today it is awarded for 50% or more participation and is available to schools, businesses, military units and federal agencies.

On it in white silhouette is a representation of the famous "Embattled Farmer" statue created by Daniel Chester French in 1874 that is in Concord, Massachusetts next to the North Bridge where the first battle of the American Revolution took place. It is commonly called the "Minuteman".
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Schools at War Flag, 1942

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

Awarded to schools where 90% of the students were regularly buying War Stamps or Bonds.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Ten Percent Flag, 1942

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

Awarded to businesses where 90% or more employees participated by subscribing 10% or more of the Gross Payroll. Probably superseded by the T flag shortly after it was introduced. Placement of the red ball  and whether it was fimbriated or not varied.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Bullseye Flag, 1942-1945

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

Awarded to businesses achieving full 100% employee participation.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


T Flag, 1942-1945

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

Awarded to businesses where 90% or more employees participated by subscribing 10% or more of the Gross Payroll. Probably replaced the 10% flag.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


T plus Star Flag, 1944-1945

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

Awarded to businesses where 90% or more employees participated by subscribing 10% or more of the Gross Payroll and the business met their full quota for the year.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Red Minuteman Flag

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

Nothing is known about this design except that an actual flag made by the Sherritt Flag Company exists.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Minuteman Flag with 1 Year Star

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

A current design signifying the business has met the minimum participation requirements for a second consecutive year. An additional star is added for each consecutive year. The size and placement of the star varies.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Minuteman Flag with 5 Year Star

[Savings Bond flag] image by Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006

A current design signifying the business has met the minimum participation requirements for five consecutive years. In theory, any combination of white and gold stars may be added to a flag depending on the number of consecutive years of qualification.
Dave Martucci, 15 March 2006


Minuteman Flag with 11 Year Stars

[Savings Bond flag] image by Fred Schwan, 20 March 2016

I just purchased a Minuteman flag on ebay that has three stars at the lower right corner. Two are gold and one is white. I suspect that this flag is for the the 11th year of qualifying for the Minuteman flag.
Fred Schwan, 20 March 2016

This photo explains the symbolism of the stars awarded for participation in the U.S. Savings Bond Program. Each gold star is for 5 years consecutive of by at least 50% of employees participating and each white star is for 1 year of at least 50% of employees participating in the program.
Zachary Harden, 21 March 2016


Minuteman flags submitted for identification

[Savings Bond flag] image by Nathan Bliss, 16 September 1999

It's a savings bond participation flag awarded by Treasury to federal/military organizations that have a high rate of participation in annual savings bond drives. A Concord minuteman surrounded by stars.
Joe McMillan, 16 September 1999

The flag is dark blue, the same shade as the blue of the U.S. flag, with the silhouette of the Concord minuteman* in white surrounded by a circle of 13 white stars. It was once--and may still be--awarded by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to organizations that met a particular standard for participation in the sale of savings bonds through payroll deductions. The organization could then fly the flag for a one-year period until the end of the next year's bond drive.
____________
*The American Revolution began on 19 April 1775 with clashes between colonial militiamen, known as "minutemen" from the short time in which they were supposed to be ready for action, and British regular troops at the Massachusetts towns of Lexington and Concord. There is a minuteman statue at the site of each battle. That at Lexington portrays a bare-headed minuteman holding his musket in both hands. The one at Concord shows a minuteman wearing a three-cornered hat supporting his musket with one hand, the other hand resting on a plow.
Joe McMillan, 18 September 2002


Blue Minuteman silhouette flag

  Image by Greg Hunter, 19 February 2008

From all the information I have received so far, I believe this flag is a post [US] Civil War Flag, sometime between (1870s & 1920s). Could be somehow associated with War Bonds - however, prior to 1932. The flag is beige, a blue Minuteman silhouetted in the center and a blue star in each corner. A red with white background shield in center of Minuteman.
Greg Hunter, 19 February 2008