This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Taiwan political parties

Last modified: 2014-02-06 by zoltán horváth
Keywords: taiwan | political parties |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



See also:

Political Parties in Taiwan

The major Pan-China parties:

  • Kuomintang
  • New Party
  • People First Party (No flag, as I aware of and as noted in the party's constitution. Party colours are Orange and Blue.)

The latter two are factions of the Kuomintang split during the Lee Teng Hui era.

Pro-Independence Parties:

John Ma, 17 November 2003

Taiwan Independence Flag

[Taiwan Independence Flag] by Dean Thomas

In the AOL news today, there were pictures taken of a rally in Taipei where over 100,000 persons demanded a name change from REPUBLIC OF CHINA to TAIWAN. They were carrying a huge flag with them.
Dean Thomas. 6 September 2003


This can not be a Taiwanese (proposed) national flag. It's a political rally banner for foreign press pictures. Unless the Taiwanese would change also the national language to English.
Francisco Santos, 6 September 2003


[Taiwan Independence Flag] by Marc Pasquin
Source: YZZK

Taken from a photography published in the 21/09/2003 issue of YZZK magazine. It shows a groups of people demonstrating in Taiwan while flying 2 types of flags: the first is a green-white-green pale.
Marc Pasquin, 14 April 2005


Judging by the AP photos posted to flagforum.skalman.nu it appears the emblem outline of Taiwan rather than the emblem illustrated.
Marcus Wendel, 8 September 2008


[Taiwan Independence Flag] by Marc Pasquin
Source: YZZK

Except for the central design (a green triangle over a green disc) and the presence of Chinese characters over it (I'd guess they might simply say "taiwan republic" as the text in latin script at the bottom). Incidently, you can see someone holding in his/her hand a small version of it so it is a flag, not a banner.

The fact that they have retained the same colours (and in the same order) from the previously reported one means that there probably is some symbolism to it. Maybe something relating the Taiwan Independence Party.
Marc Pasquin, 14 April 2005


Campaign Flag(s)

[Campaign flag] contributed by Jorge Candeias

Detail
[Taiwan Independence Flag] contributed by Jorge Candeias

This a picture of a very happy Taiwanese citizen, waving a flag off the roof of his car. It illustrated an article on the victory of Chen Shui-bian in the March 2004 elections, and I strongly suspect that this is a short-lived campaign flag. See detail for the amount of writing it includes and the number 1, which is an electoral code.

This is interesting because here whenever presidential elections are held, we also see lots of flags, but never flags that include the picture of the candidate, much less his wife (supposing that that's who the woman is). Flags here include flags with the campaign slogans and logos, of the parties and organizations that endorse the candidacies, the national flag also pops up every once and a while, other flags are also seen on occasion, but photos never appear.

And it's also interesting because this topic of campaign flags is very poorly studied, probably due to the extreme brevity in each of these flag's life.
Jorge Candeias, 8 November 2004


The woman is Madam Vice President, Annette Lui
Miles Li, 9 November 2004


Taiwanese election advertisement featuring flag

Today happens to be the 100th anniversary of the 1911 Chinese Revolution, so it is the perfect time to share this Taiwanese election advertisement made for the Kuomintang in 2004, featuring the National Flag Anthem on the soundtrack: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GuTKZS_ztnk
Quite apart from being a blatant rip-off of Qantas' advertising campaign, this video clip also raises interesting questions about the ethics of using the national flag - and of accusing opponents of burning the national flag - for electoral gains. (To complicate things further, the Taiwanese flag does have the Kuomintang flag in the canton!)
Miles Li, 10 October 2011