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Polish Royal banners

Last modified: 2017-11-11 by andrew weeks
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Banner of Władysław Łokietek

[banner of Wladyslaw Lokietek] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Władysław IV the Short (1320-1333) was the ruler of Kujavia in central Poland, who reunified the Polish kingdom. He inflicted a severe defeat on the Teutonic Knights at Plowce in 1331.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banner of Kazimierz Wielki

[banner of Kazimierz Wielki] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Kasimir III the Great (1333-1370), son of Władysław IV, was the most distinguished of Polish medieval kings.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banners of Władysław Jagiełło

[banner of Wladyslaw Jagiello] by Adam Kromer, from his site.
PLEASE NOTE: 

Władysław V Jagiełło (of Lithuania) (1386-1434) acquired the Polish throne through marriage to the Angevin dynasty; famous for his great victory over the Teutonic Knights of Prussia in 1410 at Grunwald (Tannenberg).
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banner of Wielkie Księstwo Litewskie (Grand Duchy of Lithuania)

[banner of Grand Duchy of Lithuania] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Lithuania was dynastically united with Poland in the late 14th century under the Jagiełło family; the two states were constitutionally linked by the Union of Lublin in 1569.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banner of Kazimierz Jagiełłończyk

[Banner of Kazimierz Jagiellonczyk] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Kazimier IV (1447-1492) after a long war with the Teutonic Knights imposed on them the Peace of Thorn (1466). by which Poland acquired Malbork (Marienburg) and Gdańsk (Danzig) and access to the sea. In 1471 he was able to vindicate his son's claim to the throne of Bohemia, to which the younger Władysław later added Hungary.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banner of Zygmunt August

[Banner of Zygmunt August] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Under Zygmunt August (Sigismund II Augustus) (1548-1572) Calvinism spread widely in Poland until in 1565 the Counter-Reformation took over and Catholicism was re-established. In 1569 the Union of Lublin welded all provinces into an indissoluble entity under an elected sovereign.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banner of Zygmunt III Waza

[banner of Zygmunt III Waza] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Zygmunt III Waza (Sigismnund III Vasa of Sweden) (1587-1632) established the Uniate Church in 1596, whereby a large body of his Orthodox subjects accepted the supremacy of Rome.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000

In Swedish he was called Sigismund (without any number; he is so far the only Swedish king by that name). He was king of Sweden 1592-1599.
Elias Granqvist, 11 Aug 2001


Personal Banner of Zygmunt III Waza

[personal banner of Zygmunt III Waza] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Royal Flag of Poland (1605). (personal flag of King Sigismund III). Source: this website. Hope you can add it to one of the Polish sites.
The site shows a beautiful flag, more elaborated than this one, and mentions as source: Alfred Znamierowski's Book The World Encyclopedia of Flags (p. 56).
Andrew Andersen, 7 Oct 2002


Banner of Władysław IV Waza

[Banner of Wladyslaw IV Waza] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Władysław IV Waza (1632-1648), son of Zygmunt III and king of Poland and Sweden.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000

It should be noted, that Wladislaw IV never was king of Sweden. This was only a title of pretence. His father had been king of Sweden, but was disposed when he wanted to turn Sweden catholic.
Elias Granqvist, 11 Aug 2001


Banner of Królestwo Polskie (Kingdom of Poland) during Saxon reign

[Banner of Kingdom of Poland during Saxon reign] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Elector Frederick Augustus of Saxony was elected King of Poland in 1697 as Augustus II. Kings of Saxony reigned Poland until 1764.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000


Banner of Stanisław August Poniatowski

[Banner of Stanislaw August Poniatowski] by Adam Kromer, from his site.

Stanisław August Poniatowski (Stanislav II, 1764-1795) saw chaos continuing in Poland and Prussia and Russia saw to it that Poland did not exist anymore at the end of his reign.
Jarig Bakker, 23 Sept 2000