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Estonia

Eesti Vabariik, Republic of Estonia

Last modified: 2013-11-21 by zoltán horváth
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(7:11)
image by António Martins, 22 April 1999


Official Name: Republic of Estonia (Eesti Vabariik)
Capital: Tallinn
Location: Baltic Eastern Europe
Government Type: Parliamentary Democracy
Flag adopted: 7 August 1990 (first adopted 21 November 1918)
Coat of arms adopted: 16 October 1990
ISO Code: EE



See also:

Regional Flags:

Other sites:


Description of flag

The Estonian national flag is a tri-color, with three equal horizontal bands. The upper one is blue, the middle one black and the lower white. The width to length ratio is 7:11, and the exact standard dimensions are 1000 by 1650 millimeters.

The Law regarding the confirmation of the graphic specifications for the national flag and coat of arms was passed on July 7, 1992. The Law was confirmed with definitions of the images appearing on the small and large national coats of arms in conformance with the international color palette PANTONE 1.

The blue tone on the coat of arms is 285C. Colors of the triad: C91% CYAN (blue), M 43% MAGENTA, Y 0% YELLOW, B 0% BLACK.

The colors of the national flag are representative of Estonian history and folk costumes, as well as occurring in nature. The significance of the individual colors has been explained in various histories: blue is referred to as the color of faith, loyalty and devotion; it also reflects the qualities of the sky, sea, and lakes. Black is said to be symbolic of the dark past of suffering of the Estonian people; the traditionally black jacket of the Estonian peasant during past times. White represents the striving towards enlightenment and virtue. White is also the color of birch bark and snow, and summer nights illuminated by the midnight sun.

The days for raising the official flag are: January 1 - New Year's Day; February 24 - Independence Day; May 1 - May Day; second Sunday in May -Mother's Day; June 14 - Remembrance Day (anniversary of forceful deportation); June 23 - Victory Day; June 24 - Midsummer's; November 16 - Rebirth Day.

The flag atop Pikk Hermann Tower on Toompea hill in Tallinn is raised every morning at dawn, but not before seven o'clock; it is lowered at sunset, but not later than ten o'clock. The flags on other buildings are scheduled by local government codes.
Toomas Molder

From <ew80.www.ee>:
"The state flag, which is also the national flag, is rectangular in shape, divided into three horizontal bands of equal size. The upper band is blue, the middle one is black and the lowest band is white. The proportions of the flag are 11:7 and its normal size is 165x105 cm. The blue-black-white flag was re-adopted as the state flag on the 7th of August, 1990 and the Law on State Flag was passed on the 6th of April, 1993."
Jorge Candieas, 26 October 1998

I have had a long discussion with the department of Estonia national symbols. They couldn't explain to me how it was possible this blue tone is so dark as at <www.rk.ee>. Nobady use that color, BUT the law say so since 1992- "the blue tone on the coat of arms is 285C; colors of the triad: C91% CYAN (blue), M 43% MAGENTA (??), Y 0% YELLOW, B 0% BLACK".
This was a chaotic time, I think that the error with the blue tone was made by some unknown person..
I am an historian, and I know exactly - before World War II (the first Republic) the blue tone of Estonian flag was "sky-blue". That means strictly opponent to the dark! (It must be a clearly optical difference between blue and black!). I have found a link in your page to an Estonian Flag with the right blue color (historical true, since 1884 as a flag of Estonian student corporation, until 1940 as a national flag) blue color. That is <www.customs.ee>.
Indrek Kiverik, 11 January 2001

According to the French Navy Album, issue 2000 [pay00] - National Flag CS-/C-- (7:11) - Blue-black-white tricolour, unusual ratio - anyone knows reason for it?
It seems that no flag is designated --W/--- (nor ---/-S- but that is less odd).
Željko Heimer, 24 August 2001

These flags and ensigns are more or less identical to those used by the Republic of Estonia before Soviet invasion, which are showed in Flaggenbuch ('Estland'). 7:11 ratio is already mentioned in Flaggenbuch. I seem to remember that 7:11 ratio is also widespread among Estonian local flags.
Ivan Sache, 25 August 2001

See also: Estonia - History of the Flag


National Flag at the London 2012 Olympics

The protocol manual for the London 2012 Olympics (Flags and Anthems Manual London 2012 [loc12]) provides recommendations for national flag designs. Each NOC was sent an image of the flag, including the PMS shades, for their approval by LOCOG. Once this was obtained, LOCOG produced a 60 x 90 cm version of the flag for further approval. So, while these specs may not be the official, government, version of each flag, they are certainly what the NOC believed the flag to be.
For Estonia: PMS 285 blue and black. The vertical flag is simply the horizontal version turned 90 degrees anti-clockwise.
Ian Sumner, 10 October 2012


Legislation

From <web-static.vm.ee>:
"Segments from the Estonian Flag Act
On 1 January 2006, the new State Flag Act enters into force in Estonia. The most important change introduced by the new law is that all individuals have the right to use the state flag as a national flag whenever they feel it fit to do so, but the use of the flag must be appropriate and respectful of time-honoured traditions. State flags are permanently flown over state institutions, local and city governments, and also at border crossing points.The new law reduces the number of official flag days from present fifteen to thirteen, including 9 May and Europe Day. Election days and referendum days are also flag days. However, flags must be hoisted on all buildings on only three of these days.Another major change compared to the past situation is the hoisting of state flags on school and university buildings on allschooldays. This regulation entered into force on the 1 September 2005.
The goal of this Act is to set out the shape and description of the Estonian flag along with the conditions and regulations for its use on the basis of the new principles. The Act establishes utilization regulations for state and local government institutions, and provides citizens with freedom to use the flag.
#1 The Estonian Flag
(1) The Estonian Flag is Blue-Black-White.
(2) The Estonian Flag is used as the national and state flag.
#2 Description of the Estonian Flag
(1) The Estonian national flag is a tri-colour, with three equal horizontal bands. The upper one is blue, the middle one black and the lower white. The width to length ratio is 7:11
#4 Display and use of the Estonian Flag
(1) Everyone has the right to display and use the Estonian flag as long as it is in accordance with the act and follows honoured traditions.(
(2) The Estonian flag is displayed on buildings and stationary flag staffs on Independence Day, Victory Day and the Restoration of Independence Day.
#5 Daily display of the Estonian Flag
(1) The Estonian Flag is not lowered from the buildings of the Riigikogu, the Estonian Government, the Supreme Court, other courthouses, the State Audit, the Chancellor of Justice, Ministries, the Bank of Estonia, local and city governments, and border crossing points.
(2) The Estonian Flag is displayed at Estonian foreign representations according to the laws and norms of the host nation.
(3) The Estonian Flag is to be displayed on elementary and high schools, vocational schools, institutions of professional higher education and universities on school days.
(5) Flags that are continuously displayed must be illuminated during hours of darkness.
#6 Flag Days
3 January - Day of Commemoration to the War of Independence fighters (Vabadussõjas võidelnute mälestuspäev)
2 February - Anniversary of the Tartu Peace Treaty (Tartu rahulepingu aastapäev)
4 February - Independence Day, Anniversary of the Republic of Estonia (Eesti iseseisvuspäev)
14 March - Native Language Day (Emakeele päev)
every second Sunday in May - Mothers Day (Emadepäev)
9 May - Europe Day (Euroopa Päev)
4 June - National Flag Day (Lipupäev)
14 June - Day of Mourning and Commemoration (Leinapäev). Flags are flown as mourning flags
23 June - Victory Day (Võidupüha)
24 June - St John's Day or Midsummer's Day (Jaanipäev)
20 August - Restoration of Independence Day (Taasiseseisvumispäev)
1 September - Day of Knowledge (Teadmiste päev)
every second Sunday in November - Fathers Day (Isadepäev)
(3) On Flag Days, government institutions, local and county governments and public legal entities,display the flag.
(4) The Estonian Government can make one-time decisions regarding the display of the Estonian Flag by government institutions, local and county governments and public legal entities, and on other days to mark events of importance for the Estonian state and its people.
#7 Hoisting and lowering the flag
(1) The Estonian Flag is hoisted at sunrise, no later than 8.00 and is lowered at sunset, no later than 22.00.
(4) The Estonian Flag is not lowered on St. John's Day, (Midsummer's Day) June 24.
#9 Requirements for displaying the flag
(2) The minimum size of a flag displayed on a building or on flag staffs on the roof of the building must be105X165 centimetres.
(3) When the flag is displayed vertically the blue band should be on the observers left.
#10 Displaying the Estonian Flag with other flags
(1) If the Estonian Flag is raised with other flags, the Estonian flag must be at a position of superior prominence or honour.
(3) The flags of other nations are placed after the Estonian Flag alphabetically according to their French name.Only the flags of European Union countries are placed alphabetically according to their name in their ownlanguage.
(4) If the Estonian Flag is displayed with flags of other countries or international organisations and with Estonian county, city, parish or other Estonian flags, the Estonian county, city, parish or other Estonian flag must be placed to left of the international organisation's flag when looking at the line flags from behind.
(5) Depending on the location of the line of flags or on the number of flags, points 3-4 can be changed taking into consideration that the Estonia Flag must be at a position of superior prominence or honour.
#11 Displaying the Estonian Flag with European Union Flag
(1) The European Union Flag is displayed along with Estonian Flag on buildings of the Riigikogu, the Estonian Government, the Supreme Court, other courthouses, the State Audit, the Chancellor of Justice, Ministries,the Bank of Estonia, the General Staff of the Defence Forces, local and city governments on Europe Day and on the day of European Parliamentary elections.
(2) The Estonian Government determines the border crossing points where the European Union Flag is to be continuously displayed with the Estonian Flag.
(3) The Foreign Minister regulates the displaying of European Union flags at Foreign Representations. The European Union flag is displayed with the Estonian State Flag.
#12 Displaying the flag during a period of mourning
(1) During a period of national mourning, the Estonian Flag is displayed as a flag of mourning.
(2) When the Estonian Flag is displayed during a period of mourning, a black ribbon is attached to the top of the flagstaff or the flag is flown at half-mast.Use of the Estonian Flag as a flag of mourning is not restricted to national days of mourning. If required,anyone can use the Estonian Flag as a flag of mourning.
#15 Use of the Estonian Flag and its colour combination
(3) Anyone can use a pennant with the Estonian Flags colour combination. The pennant does not replace the Estonian Flag.
(4) The image of the Estonian Flag cannot be used in a trademark."
Zachary Harden, 21 November 2005


Vertical Banner


image by Zachary Harden, 21 November 2005

This is a vertical banner that is hung on a wall according to drawing at "Segments from the Estonian Flag Act".
Zachary Harden, 21 November 2005


Table Flag


image by Zachary Harden, 21 November 2005

This is a table flag according to drawing at "Segments from the Estonian Flag Act". The flag is shallow-tailed twice on contrary to the vertical banner.
Zachary Harden, 21 November 2005


Pennant


image by Zachary Harden, 31 October 2009

This is a pennant according to drawing at "Segments from the Estonian Flag Act". This is like the "husband pennants" that is present in Finland.
Zachary Harden, 21 November 2005