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City of Duisburg (Germany)

Stadt Duisburg, Northrhine-Westphalia

Last modified: 2017-11-11 by klaus-michael schneider
Keywords: duisburg | homberg am niederrhein | rheinhausen | rumeln-kaldenhausen | walsum | bend wavy | lion(red) | statant | bucket | rose(silver) | cross(black) | maltese cross | st. dyonisius | chief | demi-escarbuncle |
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[City of Duisburg] 3:5  image by Stefan Schwoon, 23 Feb 2001 See also:

Introduction

Duisburg, ca. 525,000 inhabitants, is a main river port located on the Rhine river and an industrial center.
Ivan Sache, 7 May 2002

At the beginning of the 19th century the city of Duisburg (Wesel county) was the no.4 among the cities of the Prussian duchy of Kleve (more important had been Kleve, Wesel and Xanten). It formed an administrative unit with Wanheim-Angershausen, a settlement within the duchy of Berg (Düsseldorf county). Also some further minor settlements belonged to Duisburg and in 1801 Kasslerfeld was gained, which had belonged to Moers before.
After the withdrawal of French troops in 1815 Prussia regained the area. Duisburg became part of Dinslaken county (Kleve district (Regierungsbezirk); Jülich-Kleve-Berg-Province). In 1822/23 not only the two Rhineprovinces were united but also the subdivisions. Kleve district joined Düsseldorf district. The counties of Essen and Dinslaken merged, forming the new county of Duisburg.
In 1857 Duisburg quit the unit with Wanheim-Angershausen and finally became a county-free city in 1873. In 1902 Wanheim-Angershausen was reunited with Duisburg.
In following years several incorporations took place as follows:
-the cities of Meiderich and Ruhrort incl. Beeck municipality on 1 October 1905,
-the city of Hamborn together with 10 smaller villages on 1 August 1929
-the cities of Homberg am Niederrhein, Rheinhausen and Walsum, the municipality of Rumeln-Kaldenhausen and the village of Baerl, a part of Rheinkamp municipality, on 1 January 1975.
The city was renamed into Duisburg-Hamborn from 1929 to 1935.
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 4 Aug 2011

Current Flag

Description of current flag:
It is s red-white horizontal bicolour.
Source: Staack 1997
Stefan Schwoon, 23 Feb 2001

Borough of Homberg

Homberg plain Flag

[Borough of Duisburg-Homberg plain flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider; 10 Jul 2011

Description of plain flag:
It is a black over yellow horizontal bicolour.
Source: Stadler 1972, p. 54
Klaus-Michael Schneider; 10 Jul 2011

Homberg Flag with Coat of Arms

[Borough of Duisburg-Homberg flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider; 23 Jul 2011

Description of flag:
It is a black over yellow horizontal bicolour, the colours of the counts of Moers. The coat of arms of the former city of Homberg am Niederrhein was that of the counts added by green field divided by a silver wavy bend, alluding to Prussian Rhineprovince. It is in the centre of the flag.
Sources: Stadler 1972, p. 54 and this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider; 10 Jul 2011

Borough of Rheinhausen

Rheinhausen plain Flag

[Borough of Duisburg-Rheinhausen plain flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider; 10 Jul 2011

Description of plain flag:
The ratio is 3:5. It is a blue over yellow horizontal bicolour.
Source: Stadler 1972, p.82

Rheinhausen Flag with Coat of Arms

[Borough of Duisburg-Rheinhausen flag] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider; 25 Jul 2011

Description of flag:

The ratio is 3:5. It is a blue over yellow horizontal bicolour. In the centre of the flag is the coat of arms of the former city of Rheinhausen.
Source: this online catalogue

Description of coat of arms:
The shield is divided per fess. Above in a golden field is a red, statant lion holding a red, wooden bucket with a handle in his left fore paw. Below are three silver (=white) roses in a triangular order two above one.
Meaning:
According to source the arms are those of the family Friemersheim (or Vrymersheim). The bucket is canting for former municipality of Oberemmerich. The coat of arms was approved by Prussian ministry of state in 1935, after Rheinhausen had gained city rights in 1934.
Source: Stadler 1972, p.82
Klaus-Michael Schneider; 25 Jul 2011

Borough of Rumeln-Kaldenhausen

[Borough of Duisburg-Rumeln-Kaldenhausen] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider; 25 Jul 2011

Description of flag:
The ratio is 3:5. It is an armorial flag.
Source: this online catalogue

Description of coat of arms:
The shield is divided per fess. Above the silver (= white) field is divided by a black centred cross. Below in a blue field are three silver roses ordered bendily.
Meaning:
The cross is representing the archbishopric and electorate of Köln. The roses are taken from the arms of Friemersheim family.
Klaus-Michael Schneider; 25 Jul 2011

Borough of Walsum

[Borough of Duisburg-Walsum] image by Klaus-Michael Schneider; 10 Jul 2011

Description of flag:
In the centre of a plain blue flag is a white Maltese cross superimposed by the coat of arms.
Description of coat of arms:
In a red field is a plain silver (=white) inescutcheon, the whole is superimposed by a golden (=yellow) demi-escarbuncle having eight beams in full. The upper part of this ensemble is superimposed by a silver (=white) chief, showing the blue coated bust of beheaded St.Dyonisius, having risen his right hand in order to give a blessing and holding in his left hand his head nimbed golden (=yellow) and crowned by a mitre.
Meaning:
The shield with demi-escarbuncle and inescutcheon, aka as Glevenrad is symbolizing the dukes of Kleve, the former rulers. The chief is alluding to St.Dionisius, the patron saint of the parish church of Alt-Walsum. The Maltese cross is symbolizing that there existed a base of the Military and Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem, which had been established in 1281.
Source: Stadler 1972, p. 96
Klaus-Michael Schneider; 10 Jul 2011


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