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Sögel Comprehensive Municipality (Germany)

Samtgemeinde Sögel, Landkreis Emsland, Lower Saxony

Last modified: 2017-08-28 by klaus-michael schneider
Keywords: soegel(sg) | soegel | boerger | spahnharrenstaette | antler | acorns(8) | beehive | millstone | birch(leaf) | scales | saint | boar(head) | wheat(ear) | oak(leaf) | cross(latin) | dolmen |
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[SG Sögel flag] 1:1 image by Jörg Majewski, 8 Nov 2007
See also:

Sögel Comprehensive Municipality (SG)

SG Sögel Flag


Source: this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider,

SG Sögel Coat of Arms

[SG Sögel coat of arms] image by Jörg Majewski, 8 Nov 2007

Shield Vert eight acorns Argent ordered 3:3:2, chief engrailed Or an antler Gules garnished Argent.
Meaning:
Each acorn is representing one municipality within the comprehensive municipality
According to state archive Hannover the flag was approved in 1991
Source: municipal webpage and state archive Hannover
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 23 Jan 2016


Municipalities without proper Flag

The following municipalities have no proper flag:
Groß Berßen, Hüven, Klein Berßen, Stavern and Werpeloh
Sources: this online catalogue and 2 of Hauptsatzung of Stavern municipality (date omitted in source)
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017


Börger Municipality

Börger Flag

[Börger municipal flag] 3:5 image by Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017

It is a yellow over red horizontal bicolour with centred arms.
Source: this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017

Börger Coat of Arms

Shield parted per fess, above Gules a beehive Or flanked by two bich leaves Or, beneath Or a millstone Gules.
Meaning:
The birch leaves are symbolising the interpretation of the municipality's name as "Burg iri". The beehive is symbolising the tradition of apiary in the heathers of the Hümmling. The millstone is reminding on the many mills, which existed in Börger in the past. The shield is parted per fess the same way as that one of Corvey Imperial Abbey, to which Börger belonged until the 13th century. Red and yellow are also the colours of the Bishopric of Münster, being the successor of Corvey Abbey until 1803.
Source:
German WIKIPEDIA
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017


Sögel Municipality

Sögel Flag

[Sögel municipal flag] 2:3 image by Jörg Majewski, 9 Nov 2007


Source: this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider,

Sögel Coat of Arms

[Sögel municipal coat of arms] image by Jörg Majewski, 9 Nov 2007

Shield parted per pale, at dexter Azure apair of scales Or, at sinister Gules a nimbed saint Argent in half length portrait with book and staff, in base an embowed pile reversed charged with a boar's head Sable.
Meaning:
The scales are symbolising that Sögel had been the seat of a local court since at least 1400. The saint is St. James the Elder, the patron saint of the village since the year 800. The boar's head is symbolising the former importance of hunting in the region. It is also a canting element, as the name of the municipality is derived from Sugila, meaning "boars-forest".
The arms were approved on 9 June 1983, the flag on 11 November 1983.
Source: Hanns Fettweis: "Die Wappen der Städte, Gemeinden und Altkreise des Emslandes", 1989 and Ralf Hartemink's webpage
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017


Spahnharrenstätte Municipality

Spahnharrenstätte Flag

[Spahnharrenstätte municipal flag] 3:5 image by Klaus-Michael Schneider,

It is a blue-yellow-blue horizontal triband with centred arms in the yellow stripe.
Source: this online catalogue
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017

Spahnharrenstätte

Coat of Arms

Shield parted per fess of Azure and Or; two wheat ears in counterchanged colours,meeting one another in chief; flanked in chief by a Latin cross Argent at dexter and a dolmen Argent at sinister, in base between the stalks an oak leaf Azure.
Meaning:
The two wheat-ears are symbolising the rural character of the municipality. They are also symbolising the two former municipalities that merged to the new municipality of Spahnharrenstätte. The oak leaf in base is a symbol for the many oak trees in the villages, especially the village squares. The cross is a symbol to remember the plague epidemy, which stuck the villages in the 17th century. The dolmen is representing the many stone age tombs that can be found in the region. It also indicates the longtime inhabitation of the area.
Source:
Ralf Hartemink's webpage
Klaus-Michael Schneider, 27 Aug 2017


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