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Prince Albert, Saskatchewan (Canada)

Last modified: 2012-08-09 by rob raeside
Keywords: saskatchewan | prince albert | triangle: green (4) yellow (1) |
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[Prince Albert, Saskatachewan] image by Jarig Bakker

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Description of the flag

Prince Albert is the 3rd largest City in Saskatchewan. Located in the broad valley of the North Saskatchewan River near the geographical center of the province where the agricultural prairie of the south and the rich forest belt of the north meet. Much of Prince Albert is built on the sloping south bank of the North Saskatchewan River while the north bank provides a spectacular view of mixed forest, typical of northern Saskatchewan.

Prince Albert functions as a service, retail and distribution centre for northern Saskatchewan's resource industries - mining, forestry and agriculture. It is anticipated that this function will continually be enhanced by increased northern resource development. A well developed highway system links Prince Albert with surrounding areas. The City is also the focal point for Northern Saskatchewan's railway network.
City of Prince Albert at


This flag was designed by Miss Milda Hunter of Arborfield and modified by Mr. Carter Watson and the Celebration’s Committee during Prince Albert’s 75th Jubilee Year in 1979 Declared the "Jubilee Flag", it was later declared the Official Flag of the City of Prince Albert on January 1, 1980 by the City Council.

The symbolism is as follows:

  • Green & Gold - the official City colours
  • Green - represents forests
  • Gold - represents agriculture
  • Four Triangles - represent the building blocks of industry: Fur-Fish-Forestry-Farming
  • Stylized tree - represents the abundance of parks and recreational playground
  • Arrow pointing north - represents all roads that lead north to and from Prince Albert, the “Gateway to the North”
  • Arrowhead symbol - paying tribute to our original inhabitants
    Dean McGee, 10 August 2002